Tag: academic freedom

Dr C Magoulas v QMUL (part III)

If you need background to this dispute read first part I. For my general commentary on the case see ‘Academic position, age discrimination and social justice‘. If you would like to know how Queen Mary failed to follow its own Redeployment Procedure when dismissing Babis see part II. Here, I comment on three (of the four) final (summary) points in the Employment Appeal Tribunal Judgment (paragraphs 34-36). (more…)

Dr C Magoulas v QMUL (part II)

This post continues an account and critique of the EAT Judgment

“The Tribunal’s Decision on the Application for Reconsideration

21.              The Claimant applied for a review.  The ET refused that application because there was no reasonable prospect of the decision being varied or revoked.  The application had been based on a “new finding of fact” in the decision of a different ET in a different case.  The ET held that the new evidence would not probably have had an important influence on the outcome.  That is not challenged on this appeal.”

Reading the above one may ask: what was the “new finding of fact”? And how come the ET [Employment Tribunal] held that the new evidence would not probably have had an important influence on the outcome? I pause to consider this issue. It relates to the failure of QMUL to enact its redeployment procedure as required by employment law in a redundancy situation. (more…)

Simon Gaskell should reinstate John Allen

Simon Gaskell should reinstate John Allen to his post at Queen Mary. It is the right thing to do after the Employment Tribunal’s findings that John’s dismissal was unfair. The Tribunal found that removing the whole of the John’s pre-sabbatical work was such a serious breach of contract that, taken together with the failure to deal with his grievance in a reasonable time, it would have justified resignation and a constructive dismissal claim. (more…)

Imperial College management and Professor Stefan Grimm teach us:

What should we learn from the recent suicide at Imperial College? A collation of comments from the discussion in the Times Higher Education pages gives hope. However, one commentator, Jim, has spotted a danger: “If we tar all senior management as the same simply because they are making people redundant, decent compassionate people will opt out and only the real monsters will do these jobs.” I would say reform is urgent, for “The record suggests… such monsters are climbing high on the ladders.”

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How to avoid petrification from the real monsters? Reform is required with respect to university governance; I suggest we pay close attention to concerned academics:

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